Harbor News

All Pumpout Service Ends
Predicted freezing temperatures later this week requires the winterization of our pumpout vessel and shoreside waste station. All pumpout services will end this week. If you still have a vessel in the water and need a waste tank pumpout, please contact the Dartmouth Harbormaster pumpout request line at 774-473-8411 prior to 8 a.m. on Wednesday 11/6/2019 to schedule service. Thank you.
Posted on 05 Nov 2019 by harbormaster
Automatic Weekly Pump-out Service Ends


If you signed your vessel up for weekly automatic waste removal, that service has ended for the 2019 season. Diminished use of vessels results in needless visits to empty holding tanks. Starting the week of October 7, 2019, waste pump-out service will be on-demand only.

To request a needed pump-out, please call our message line at 774-473-8411 anytime, our office phone at 508-999-0759, or email us at harbormaster@dartmouthharbormaster.com. Please provide your vessel name, mooring/slip number and pump-out fitting location (port/starboard).
On-demand service will continue weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon until further notice (until freezing overnight temperatures are predicted).

Thank you for helping to keep our waterways clean.

Harbormaster Melo
Posted on 01 Oct 2019 by harbormaster
Marshall Catboat Rendezvous 2019
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There were 26 Marshall Catboats motoring through the 11am bridge opening on July 27, 2019. Click the link below to see the parade!

Marshall Catboat Rendezvous

Posted on 27 Jul 2019 by harbormaster
2019 Fish Kill in Padanaram Harbor
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The Division of Marine Fisheries has determined that a fish kill in Padanaram Harbor (several thousand fish) was caused by a lack of dissolved oxygen in the Harbor and Apponagansett River.

The fish kill involved only one species, Menhaden, which commonly expire in hot weather and enclosed embayments or rivers. Long stretches of cloudy, hot weather contribute to lowered oxygen levels. Large schools of fish in small, tight embayments often "smother" themselves.

There are no perpetrators responsible for this mortality. Menhaden (also known as Pogies) are "victims of their own success" having recently been observed in Padanaram Harbor flourishing in large dense schools that caused them to "suffocate" and die off from lack of oxygen.

Menhaden are an abundant and important food source for large predators like striped bass, bluefish, etc. in our region. When large schools of bait fish enter warm-water estuaries and rivers in large numbers during summer months, they deplete the water's dissolved oxygen and die in large numbers. Insufficient oxygen across the and through the gills of tightly-packed fish in shallow, warm, brackish water causes death. Predator fish and fowl feast on the dead and dying fish, leaving partial carcass remains on boats, docks and our shoreline.

There are no toxins or other pollutants contained in those shoreline or floating fish carcasses. They should be allowed to return to the food chain for crab and other fish food, which will prevent rodent and fly infestations.

Water quality testing by Town Health Officials has reportedly shown acceptable, passing results for continued bathing activity.





Posted on 26 Jul 2019 by harbormaster
Updated Mooring Waitlist
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You can view our most current Mooring Waitlist which was updated on July 12, 2019 here
Posted on 13 Jul 2019 by harbormaster
Coast Guard reminds Mainers to label canoes, kayaks with contact information
These identifying labels can help Coast Guard crew members, game wardens and marine patrol officers quickly determine whether a boat is merely adrift or if a paddler could be missing.

Coast Guard officials are asking canoe and kayak owners to clearly label their boats with contact information to help crews responding to reports of adrift boats.

As the summer season ramps up, so do the number of calls that the Coast Guard, Harbormasters, marine patrol officers and other law enforcement agencies receive about adrift or unattended canoes and kayaks. Petty Officer Matthew Strickland of Coast Guard Sector Northern New England said they had received several such reports before noon on the busy and sunny Independence Day holiday.

“It’s about two hours worth of work when we get a report of an adrift kayak,” Strickland said.

Strickland asked that kayak, canoe or other boat owners write their name, telephone number or other contact information on a card or other permanent label that is easily visible to individuals pulling up alongside in a boat. That can help the Coast Guard or other responders quickly determine whether the boat simply drifted away or if they should be on the look-out for a missing boater as well.

During the extended holiday weekend, the Coast Guard, Marine Patrols, and other agencies in the state are also participating in the national “Operation Dry Water” campaign focused on addressing impaired boating.

Officers will be conducting patrols all along the Massachusetts coast looking for boaters under the influence of drugs or alcohol and raising awareness about the dangers of impaired boating.
Posted on 07 Jul 2019 by harbormaster
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Next Waterways Management Commission Meeting
The next Waterways Commission is post-poned and TBD.